Oatmeal Soup for the Winter Witch

Haferflockensuppe für die Winterhexe


The Cailleach (also Cailleach Bhéara/ch or Cailleach Bheur/ach) is the winter goddess of Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. The name comes from the old Gaelic word Caillech, meaning “the veiled one”. In Scotland she is called Beira, the queen of winter. Beira literally translates to “old woman” or “hag”. She is an archetypal Old Woman deity associated with the winter and the wilderness, ruling over the natural world from Samhain (Halloween) to Beltane (May 1).

She brings storms and tempests over the land as she leaps across the mountains, her staff freezing the ground upon touching it. She is also the caretaker of wild and domestic animals during the dark and cold months, feeding and protecting the deer herds that accompany her. The Cailleach can shapeshift and some legends tell of her taking the shape of a huge bird when collecting firewood.

Ceann na Cailli
Ceann na Cailli

As so often nature deities are personifications of the landscape and there are many legends surrounding various mountains that are associated with the Cailleach: The Ceann na Caillí, the southmost tip of the Cliffs of Moher in Ireland, is one of many places named after the her. The tallest mountain Ben Cruachan in the region of Argyll and Bute in Scotland is said to be her home. And the Loch that lies beneath that mountain, Loch Awe, was accidentally created by her when she fell asleep and caused the valley to overflow with water.

According to another legend, winter begins when the Cailleach is washing her great plaid in the Gulf of Coryvreckan, a body of water whose name derives from the Gaelic Coire Bhreacain, meaning the “whirlpool or cauldron of the plaid”. She is also said to carry a huge hammer, that she uses to shape the mountains with as she walks, and rocks falling from the wicker basket on her back have formed certain mountain ridges.

Corryvreckan
The Corryvreckan Cauldron

The Cailleach is an ambiguous deity: She is wise and protects animals and nature, but she can also be cruel and fierce and bring tempests over the land and death to those who don’t respect her or her protégés. She rules the darker half of the year and fights spring and its goddess, Brighid, as long as her season lasts. Brighid and the Cailleach are really the two faces of the same goddess, much like Frau Holle of the German and Austrian mythology, who appears as a young, beautiful woman in summer and an old hag in the winter months. February 1st, called Là Fhèill Brìghde, marks the day when the Cailleach goes out to collect the firewood for the remaining winter. When she makes this day bright and sunny, it is easy for her to collect a lot of wood and winter will last quite a while longer. If the day is grey and dark, the witch is asleep and will run out of firewood soon after – a sign for an early spring!

cailleach6cailleach5

Deities like the Cailleach, her ambiguity, her fierceness in protecting nature and animals, her sense of justice when it comes to watching over the wild, as well as calling out and punishing the greed of humans, who exploit the earth – are so dear to me, and such important figures in these times. As we relentlessly abuse the planet and exploit its resources, we are eventually faced with the consequences. The landscape and the climate do call out our violations by showing new and destructive phenomena. What an important wake up call she gives us, and dissolves this inaccurate image of the ever-enduring, endlessly exploitable earth, that helplessly tolerates human wrongdoings until she perishes. The Cailleach teaches us that the earth fights back, that she is angered by our violations towards her.

cailleach2

Sharon Blackie, one of my favourite authors, beautifully weaves the connection between the Cailleach and climate/earth justice as well as female activism and the power of myth in this article published in the Irish Times:

Oats are a beautiful food to honour the Cailleach. They need a lot of sun to grow and will perish easily in the shade. In a sense it feels like they store all the sunshine of the summer in their seeds, and we in turn can access this reservoir in the darker months. What a beautiful gift! Maybe this is why I start to crave oatmeal as soon as the light begins to wane in the autumn … Oats are also full of minerals, but it is hard for our bodies to extract them without fermentation. In recent years, overnight oats have become a morning staple again and it is great to see that people do not munch on raw oats (like in the muesli era) anymore. But to really unlock the nutrients and neutralize inhibiors like phytic acid in grains, an acidic medium is needed. This is why longer fermentation times are better – the mixture is turning sour (aka. acidic) through the growth of  bacteria. Traditional oat meal was often fermented for up to a week. If you go for shorter fermenting times, make sure to soak the grains in an acidic medium (like yoghurt, kefir, buttermilk, or along with vinegar or lemon juice). Always eat your grains with fat.

Farmers_cutting_and_gathering_oats,_Ireland_LCCN2017656333.tif

Below you find a recipe for a simple (you might call it crude) oatmeal soup, that is so nourishing and always reminds me, that we really don’t need a lot to be fed and happy.

The highly praised Scottish oatmeal is for sure great, as there are certain types of oats that are only grown in Scotland and they quite differ from the oats we know elsewhere. I do believe though, that the landscapes we are part of have the food (and medicine) we need, so I urge you to find locally grown oats – if oats don’t grow in your area, you can use any other type of flaked grain, as long as it is whole and fresh. The term Scottish oatmeal doesn’t necessarily mean that the grain originates in Scotland, but refers to a specific preparation method, in which the oats are milled in a stone mill and dried in a kiln. This has proven to create a superior product concerning nutrients and shelf-stability. Steel cut oats are oats that have been cut rather than milled, and go rancid easily. Quick oats, are basically just very coarse flour, that has most likely gone rancid by the time you buy them.

cailleach7

When buying oatmeal, I usually go for whole rolled oats, which means they are pressed through a flaking machine – still the wholeness of the seed is in a sense intact. Any grain or seed that is shelled, cut or milled, will spoil way faster than the intact grain, so be sure to buy your grain products (and nuts and seeds) fresh whenever you can.

cailleach9
cailleach8

(Recipe)

Recipe: How to make oatmeal from sprouted oats

This is a wonderful way to make fresh, rancidity-free oatmeal (or any other grain flakes), a beloved food in our house back in Austria. The recipe will only work with whole oats!

Ingredients
  • 1 cup whole oats – or as much as you want to make!
  • 1 cup water
  • fine-meshed sieve
  • bowl
  • flake squeezer
Directions
Give the oats a quick rinse, then soak in water over night. Drain through a sieve, rinse again and place the sieve onto the bowl to drain. Cover with a lid. The next day, rinse again and move the grains around with your fingers a bit, so they don’t stick together or to the sieve. Cover again. Repeat every day until the oats sprout and the germs are two times the length of the seed. Spread the sprouted oats on a tray and let dry for a couple of days. I like to accelerate the process by putting them in a warm oven with the door left slightly ajar. You might need to move them around every now and then to dry them from all sides. The oats shouldn’t be completely dry, but dry to the touch. Use a flake squeezer to squeeze into flakes – a nice task to share together with a friend: One turns the handle, while the other one feeds the oats into the opening. Store in a glass jar in the fridge and use within 7-10 days. I’ve stored mine longer, but you need to check for mould because of the remaining humidity. The sprouted flakes also freeze well, but freshly made they are definitely superior.

Recipe: Simple & Nourishing Oat Soup

Makes 2 servings

Ingredients
  • 1 cup oat flakes, (NOT quick oats)
  • 2 Tbsp yoghurt, from pastured, happy animals – or 1 capsule probiotic powder
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 Tbsp fat, like butter or olive oil
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 cup water, or broth 
  • 2 juniper berries
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tsp Dulse seaweed flakes (optional)
Directions

Soak the oat flakes in yoghurt and water in a bowl. Cover and leave over night or for 8-12 hours at room temperature. If you go for the long fermenation, you can ferment the oats in water only for up to 5 days. You can also add a teaspoon of sour dough starter, if you have. Check and smell daily – it should smell pleasant and sour, and there shouldn’t be any mould growing.

When ready to prepare the soup, dice the onion and shred the carrots. Heat the fat in a pot and brown the onions together with the carrots for a few minutes. Add the oat flakes with the soaking water, the extra cup of water or broth and the juniper berries. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a low simmer. Cover and cook for 20 minutes. Stir every now and then to prevent oats sticking to the bottom of the pot. If the soup gets too thick, add more water or broth – for a more dense and nourishing soup, you can also use milk or cream. When the soup is done, add salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle with seaweed if desired and serve hot.

Scroll down to the very end of this post to comment, share and like! I’d love to hear from you!
Did you like this post? Consider supporting me on Patreon!
Become a Patron!

cailleach4


Sources and further Reading:

Wikipedia on the Cailleach

Image sources:

Ceann na Cailli

Ben Cruachan

Loch Awe

The Corryvreckan Cauldron

Farmers cutting Oats in Ireland



(German version)
cailleach1

Hafersuppe für die Winterhexe

Die Cailleach (auch Cailleach Bhéara/ch oder Cailleach Bheur/ach) ist eine Wintergöttin der irischen, schottischen und Manx*-Mythologie. Ihr Name stammt vom gälischen Wort Caillech ab, das mit “die Verschleierte” übersetzt werden kann. In Schottland wird sie Beira, die Königin des Winters, genannt. Der Name lässt sich wortwörlich als “alte Frau” oder “Hexe” übersetzen. Die Cailleach repräsentiert den Archtypen der alten Weisen, die mit dem Winter und der wilden Natur assoziiert wird. Sie herrscht in der dunklen Jahreszeit zwischen Samhain (Halloween, Allerheiligen) und Beltane (1. Mai) über die Natur.

Sie bringt Stürme und Unwetter ins Land und kann über ganze Bergketten springen. Ihr Stock lässt bei Berührung den Boden gefrieren und so bringt sie den Winter und das Eis, wenn sie über das Gebirge wandert. Sie kümmert sich um die Tiere in der Wildnis, aber auch um die in den Ställen und Häusern. Die Cailleach füttert und beschützt das Wild, das sie stets begleitet. Sie ist auch eine Formwandlerin und manche möchten sie als riesigen Vogel gesehen haben, der Feuerholz sammelt und es in seinem Schnabel davonträgt.

Ceann na Cailli
Ceann na Cailli

Wie so viele Naturgötter ist auch die Cailleach Personifikation der Landschaft, in der ihre Legenden entstanden sind. Viele Orte, vor allem Berge werden mit ihr assoziiert: Der Ceann na Caillí (Kopf der Hexe) der südlichste Teil der Kliffe von Moher in Irland ist nach ihr benannt. Der größte Berg, genannt Ben Cruachan in der Region von Argyll and Bute in Scotland soll ihr zu Hause sein und das darunterliegende Loch, Loch Awe, wurde unabsichtlich von ihr geschaffen, als sie schlief und Wasser in das Tal fließen ließ, bis es überlief.

Nach einer anderen Legende beginnt der Winter dann wenn die Cailleach ihren Plaid** im Golf of Coryvreckan wäscht; ein Gewässer, das im Gälischen Coire Bhreacain (Kessel des Plaids) heißt. Außerdem trägt sie einen großen Hammer, mit dem sie das Gebirge formt. Manchmal fallen Steine aus ihrem Strohkorb, und diese formen ganze Gebirge.

Corryvreckan
The Corryvreckan Cauldron

Die Cailleach ist eine ambivalente Persönlichkeit: Sie ist weise und beschützt die Natur und ihre Tiere, aber sie kann auch ziemlich sauer werden und Unwetter über das Land bringen, sowie menschliche Grenzübertreter schwer bestrafen, wenn diese sie oder ihre Protégés nicht respektieren. Sie herrscht über die den Winter und kämpft gegen Brighid, die Frühlingsgöttin an, solange ihre Saison anhält. Brighid und die Cailleach sind in Wirklichkeit eine Göttin mit zwei Gesichtern, ähnlich wie Frau Holle, die man als schöne Jungfrau und als alte Hexe kennt. Am ersten Februar, genannt Là Fhèill Brìghde , geht die Cailleach Feuerholz für den restlichen Winter sammeln. Wenn das Wetter an diesem Tag schön ist, ist sie unterwegs und sammelt viel Holz – deshalb dauert der Winter noch länger an. Wenn der Tag grau ist, hat sie wahrscheinlich verschlafen und wird bald kein Holz mehr haben – ein Zeichen für einen frühen Frühling!

cailleach6cailleach5

Göttinnen wie die Cailleach, ihre Doppeldeutigkeit, ihre Wildheit und Kraft, ihr Sinn für Gerechtigkeit wenn es um den Schutz der Natur, der Wildnis und der Tiere geht sind eine große Inspiration für unsere Zeit. Die Cailleach zeigt uns, dass wir uns von der Idee der armen Erde, die hilflos unserer Ausbeutung ausgesetzt ist, verabschieden sollten. Die Verstöße und der Mißbrauch der Natur durch den Menschen haben Konsequenzen – spürbare und messbare. Wir haben sie nicht nur verletzt, sondern auch verärgert. Bedrohliche Naturphänomene, Klimawandel, sich häufende Waldbrände und Hochwasser sind die Rechnung, die uns aufgetischt wird.

cailleach2

Sharon Blackie, eine meiner Lieblings-Autorinnen, zeigt uns in ihren Büchern die Beziehung des Archetypen der Cailleach (und anderen Figuren aus Volksmärchen) und Klima-Gerechtigkeit. Sie verbindet (weiblichen) Aktivismus mit der Macht der Mythologie. Hier einer ihrer Artikel in der Irish Time (auf Englisch):

Hafer ist ein wundervolles Nahrungsmittel um die Cailleach zu ehren. Er braucht sehr viel Sonne und wächst niemals im Schatten. Es ist als ob er die ganze Sommersonne in seinen Körnern gespeichert hätte und wir können uns das in den Wintermonaten zu Nutze machen. Welch’ ein Geschenk im Winter! Vielleicht möchte ich deshalb immer Haferbrei essen, sobald die Tage kürzer werden … Hafer ist auch reich an Mineralstoffen, aber ohne Fermentierung kann der Körper schwer auf sie zugreifen. In den letzten Jahren sind die sogenannten “Overnight Oats” (Über-Nacht Hafer) als Frühstück modern geworden und ich finde es gut, dass das Essen von rohem Getreide (wie in der Müsli-Ära) beendet scheint. Um wirklich alle Nährstoffe aufschließen zu können, bedarf es aber dem Einweichen in ein saures Medium – und das entsteht bei längerer Fermentierung durch Milchsäurebakterien. Traditionell wurde Hafer oft für eine Woche oder länger fermentiert. Für kürzere Fermentierzeiten sollte man das Getreide in einer “sauren” Flüssigkeit einweichen – z.B. Joghurt, Kefir, Buttermilch, oder mit Essig oder Zitronensaft. Getreide sollte außerdem immer in Kombination mit Fett gegessen werden.

Farmers_cutting_and_gathering_oats,_Ireland_LCCN2017656333.tif

Das Rezept der Woche ist dieses Mal eine einfache Hafersuppe, die nahrhaft ist und mich immer daran erinnert, dass wir nicht viel brauchen um satt und zufrieden zu sein.

Der hoch geschätzte Schottisches Hafer ist eine tolle Sache, denn die Hafer-Sorten in Schottland sind andere als bei uns und zeichnen sich durch einen höheren Nährstoffgehalt aus. Ich bin aber überzeugt davon, dass wir unsere Nahrung aus unserer Umgebung beziehen sollten, und dass es rund um uns das gibt (oder geben könnte …) was wir brauchen.

Wenn in deiner Umgebung kein Hafer wächst, kannst du Flocken von anderem Getreide verwenden. Die Bezeichnung Schottischer Hafer bezieht sich auch nicht unbedingt auf die Herkunft des Hafers sondern auf die Verarbeitungsmethode: Der Hafer wird zwischen Steinen gemahlen (oder eher gebrochen) und vor einem Holzofen getrocknet. Dadurch bleiben Nährstoffe erhalten und er wird weniger schnell ranzig.

cailleach7

Unten findest du ein Rezept für Flocken aus gekeimtem Hafer – die beste Variante wie ich zu behaupten wage. Das ganze Korn hält wesentlich länger als ein verarbeitetes Produkt, weil Schale und Keim intakt sind. Wenn du Flocken kaufst, achte darauf, dass sie frisch sind und bevorzugterweise “gequetscht” wurden (und nicht geschnitten) – so bekommst du das ganze Korn. Schnellkoch-Varianten sind oft nichts anderes als grobes Mehl und werden sehr schnell ranzig. Dieselben Tipps gelten übrigens für alle Produkte aus Getreide, Samen und Nüssen.

cailleach9
cailleach8
 

(Rezept)

Rezept:  Gekeimte Haferflocken

Zutaten
  • 1 Becher Haferkörner
  • 1 Becher Wasser
  • feines Sieb
  • Schüssel
  • Flockenquetsche
Zubereitung

Die Körner kurz abspülen und in einer Schüssel mit Wasser einweichen. Über Nacht quellen lassen, dann in das Sieb abgießen und spülen. Das Sieb in eine Schüssel hängen und zudecken. Am nächsten Tag wieder spülen und zugedeckt stehen lassen. Den Vorgang solange wiederholen, bis die Körner keimen und der Keim ca. doppelt so lang ist wie das Korn. Auf einem Backblech oder Tablett verteilen und trocknen lassen. Das funktioniert sehr gut in einem warmen Ofen, bei dem man die Ofentür einen Spalt geöffnet lässt. Aus den halbtrockenen Körnern in der Flockenquetsche Flocken pressen. Zu zweit macht das Spaß: Eine dreht die Kurbel, während die andere langsam Körner in die Öffnung füllt. Im Glasbehälter sind die Flocken 7-10 Tage haltbar. Ich habe sie auch wesentlich länger aufgehoben, aber man sollte aufgrund der Restfeuchtigkeit immer auf Schimmel kontrollieren – ein Geruchstest hilft da immer! Die Flocken können auch eingefroren werden, aber ich finde sie frisch um Welten besser.


Rezept:  Fermentierte Hafersuppe

Für 2 Personen

Zutaten
  • 1 Becher Haferflocken (kein Instant-Hafer)
  • 2 EL Joghurt, von freilaufenden und grasgefütterten Kühen – oder 1 Kapsel Probiotika
  • 1 Becher Wasser
  • 1 EL Fett, wie Butter oder Olivenöl
  • 1 Karotte
  • 1 kleine Zwiebel
  • 1 Becher Wasser, oder Brühe
  • 2 Wacholderbeeren
  • Salz und Pfeffer, nach Geschmack
  • 1 TL Dulse-Flocken (eine Art Seetang) (optional)
Zubereitung
Die Haferflocken in Joghurt und Wasser einweichen. Zugedeckt über Nacht, oder 8-12 Stunden, stehen lassen. Für die lange Fermentation verwendet man Wasser und Haferflocken – als Starthilfe kann ein Teelöffel Sauerteig zugegeben werden (wenn vorhanden). Die Flocken etwa 5 Tage fermentieren lassen, dabei immer wieder kontrollieren: Die Mischung sollte angenehm säuerlich riechen und kein Schimmel in Sicht sein.
Für die Suppe die Zwiebel klein schneiden und die Karotte reiben. Das Fett in einem Topf erhitzen und beides darin anschwitzen. Die eingeweichten Flocken samt Wasser, dem extra Wasser oder der Brühe und den Wacholderbeeren zum Kochen bringen. Auf kleine Flamme schalten und ca. 20 Minuten köcheln lassen. Dabei immer wieder umrühren. Wenn die Suppe zu dick ist, einfach mit Wasser oder Brühe aufgießen (wer möchte kann auch Milch oder Obers verwenden). Zum Schluss mit Salz und Pfeffer abschmecken und mit Dulse-Flocken garniert anrichten.
Vielen Dank fürs Lesen – Ich freue mich über Kommentare und Likes!
Hat dir der Artikel gefallen? Vielleicht möchtest du mich auf Patreon unterstützen!
Patron werden!

cailleach4


*Bewohner der Isle of Man
**Plaid: Kleidung aus gemustertem Wollstoff

Quellen zum Weiterlesen:

Wikipedia über die Cailleach

Bildquellen:

Ben Cruachan

Loch Awe

The Corryvreckan Cauldron

Ceann na Cailli

Bauern schneiden Hafer in Irland (Farmers cutting Oats in Ireland)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: